RC Helicopters, Trees, Gears

This article was originally going to be a product review for a LT-711 remote control helicopter with spy camera. The initial experience was right out of the box with absolutely no assembly require. Just plug the charger into the wall and then into the battery. To say that we were delighted was an understatement. This […]



This article was originally going to be a product review for a LT-711 remote control helicopter with spy camera. The initial experience was right out of the box with absolutely no assembly require. Just plug the charger into the wall and then into the battery. To say that we were delighted was an understatement. This is a well built metal helicopter in a red color which was very attractive and came with a spy camera that captures your flight on an on board micro SD card.

All went well after the charge and during the test flight phase as well. This helicopter has two rotors that counter rotate and had great lift capability. In fact the lift capability was a little more than was expected as the craft quickly gained altitude and was 40 feet in the air to my amazement. During the adjustment to control the direction of the craft, it slowly went over the house and landed out of reach in a tall oak tree.

Now the catch; how do you get a lodged helicopter out of a tree without a 40 foot ladder? Being rather clever, it was thought that by actuating the controls in a random on / off and other erratic maneuvers it may be possible to have the helicopter dislodge itself. The key would be to catch it before it hit the ground and did any damage. Hitting the ground did take out a rotor that was easily repaired by using a soldering iron to melt the associated plastic damage but there was no other visible damage to the craft to our delight.

Placing the craft on the original take off pad and applying the power to lift off, it was noticed that the craft only twisted around in circles just touching the pad. It was very obvious to me that there was not enough battery left to take off, so after charging overnight, we tried again with the same results. Not what we were expecting.

As the title suggests, a close inspection reveled the top twin blades were not turning upon power up. Out comes the Phillips screwdriver which has to very small for these screw and removing the cowling and the side plate, it became evident that the crash from the tree was not the problem. While actuating the controls while the craft was in the tree with the rotors bound up had stripped out two gears which are now on shipment.

A simple test flight for a product review has now expanded to a future article on how to disassemble and replace the gears of a Hawk spy LT-711 helicopter. Look for this article when the parts arrive.

The take away from this article is to never force your motors to run when the blades are jammed in an oak tree:)

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